about me

I am currently a sociology graduate student in New York City. Committed to inclusive research and equitable resource distribution in education, I focus my studies on the Latinx identity in relation to academia. As a McNair scholar, I’ve published pieces both online (here, hi!) and in a journal on navigating predominantly white academic spaces as a woman of color. Passionate about social justice, education, and art I am also a youth worker for Girls Inc where I strive to nurture an environment full of love and eagerness in workshops aimed to inspire and empower young women to be their true selves.

I maintain my blog as an outlet of self care where I am able to publish my poetry, thoughts, and reflections during this incredibly busy time in my life.

Disfruta mi trabajo!

193 thoughts on “about me

    1. I hope professor is promoted. Making a good student greater is their job no matter the race, color or gender. I know higher education is new to a huge. Ew number of minorities but professors do this to everyone. Suck it up buttercup.

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  1. Tiffany, the dismissal of your ability to appropriately use transition words is tragic. However, the attention you have brought to the situation is to be celebrated, just like transition words themselves. Transition words are the couples counselors of sentences and paragraphs. They can bring even the most oppositional view points together to create connection and understanding, which is why they are my favorite. Therefore, I ask you to compile your list of favorite transition words that I can share with my high school language arts classes as inspiration to use transition words just as adeptly as you did.

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    1. Such a beautiful and encouraging response. I hope Tiffany sees your request; I would love to have her list of her favorite transitional words and phrases for my middle school ELA classes as well.

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      1. Thank god you do not teach my kids! As a teacher you should clearly be able to identify the issues most have with this post starting with not giving the professor the opportunity to explain or discuss the matter before elevating to extremes including going to a department head before talking with a professor. For all we know; this is an outstanding professor! There are so many legitimate claims of racism in the world. Screaming racialism without all the facts harms those who are oppressed! Shame on you!

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  2. I am not an academic. But your experience brings back memories of my college days as a student and a student activist during the eighties. In writing essays, I sometimes had self-doubt about the words I wrote vs. the words I spoke. That’s because I thought more about the appropriate use of each word in a written sentence vs. a spoken one. Did I use the word “Hence” back then? Of course! To this day, I don’t recall ever saying “hence” in conversations?

    Two cardinal rules I learned in writing is to avoid word repetition and to be concise. How many times can one use the words “thus”, “consequently”, and “ergo” in an essay? I wonder how the professor would have reacted if you had instead written the word “ergo”!?

    Your story resonates with me as I was born in the Dominican Republic and my daughter attends a Boston university. As a parent, I would definitely confront the prejudice of the professor and each rung of the university ladder including the board of trustees. We need to expose the institutional conformity with regards to prejudice and discrimination that is still prevalent in higher education. So, to you, I say Bravo! Pa’lante!

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    1. I don’t think her audience is getting that the professor is sending a message and it isn’t anything to do with her being Latina. My peer group in my University agrees. We used her paper and subject as a discussion item. Our group contained a Hawaiian, Tongan, Mexican,Black, White,Male, Female. It included Humanities students , Law, Business, and Sociology Majors.

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  3. As a Brazilian aspiring to study physics in an American university, reading your story brought me to tears. This will happen to me. I hope I survive it.
    And thank you for sharing. Thank you for speaking up. I hope I have the courage to do the same. Please, never give up and never let them make you forget how competent and intelligent you are.
    And I empathyse with editing to portray the full extent of your capabilities. English is my second language and I’m always terrified of making mistakes. I know I’ll be judged harshly for them. After all, this really isn’t my language. Though that’s a strange way to think of it, as if people can own languages and certain people have no right to know them at all.
    Well, I currently have no right to know French and English. And I hope to have no right to know Russian soon enough.

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  4. Tiffany, Thank you very much for writing this piece It is important. I am a political blogger and was just perusing the internet and stumbled on it. Changes will not occur until more people like you speak up when these types of marginalizations and prejudices occur. In my college years, the avenues for the oppressed and marginalized were few and slow. The democratization of information delivery means your pain cannot be silenced. You inspired me to write a blog about this referencing your blog post http://egbertowillies.com/2016/10/29/stories-audio-video-internet-ripping-scab-america/.

    Latino de Panamá, pero ciudadano de los Estados Unidos por veinte-pico de años. Me encanta las playas de Punta Cana.

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  5. I enjoyed your writing regarding how often we are undervalued. I confronted similar attitudes from a couple of professors in college and in law school. At the time, I realized how worthless were their comments. Adelante!

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  6. Hey, I read your “this is not your language” post that someone I follow retweeted. I’m sorry that happened to you. This happened to me too but in high school, the undergrad place I went to and was a McNair scholar at fortunately was more supportive. I’m sending good cheer for you. I didn’t end up finishing my PhD, and the microagressions, while they didn’t break me, were part of the problem at the grad program I ended up choosing.

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  7. Please keep blogging. It is so important to young people and academia that you share your story. My daughter is 14, and we are white and privileged. She attends a school and we live in a diverse culture where fighting for social justice is the daily conversation. But I don’t thing my daughter and her compatriots always get the details. And they feel that academia is a nurturing place, a safe haven. I am looking forward to sharing your blog. The first thing I thought when I read your credentials was: why is this young girl trying so hard. This sounds exhausting. Now I see what you mean. Please keep fighting. But please stop and rest when you are tired. If you were my daughter I would give you a hug of thanks and love so that, as you march on, you could carry my comfort with you. I look forward to reading more.

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  8. this is not about you, it’s about that person and their need to undermine which does say a lot. about them. i mean, what have we come to? the word “hence”? not only is it ridiculous, maybe that person should go back to elementary school instead of teaching in a university. he or she needs some real “higher education”.

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    1. I absolutely posted the above comment in the wrong place, being in reference to Academia, Love Me Back. My apologies for the unintended irony.

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  9. I have read A LOT of stories recently and this story, your story is powerful. I would be very interested in sharing your story in our upcoming global issue focusing on community experiences that assist in helping others. Please contact me for more information. Hope to hear from you soon.

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  10. Your piece was incredibly well-put, Tiffany. It seems that the area of the English language that is deemed “sophisticated” for the palates of Euro-American people (like me) are reserved for them and them alone. This was never true, and never will be. That boiling can of flesh called “professor” should not only be robbed of his/her title, but should also recognize their socio intellectual inferiority. You are better than people like them, and always will be. x Arielle

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  11. I am deeply disturbed and moved by your powerful indictment of institutional racism at the university. As an alumni to Suffolk (twice over) and former lecturer there, I will write to the University in solidarity with you, urging action. There is simply no place for this kind of behavior, anywhere!

    Solidarity forever,
    John

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  12. Dear Tiffany, I read your post, “Academia Love me Back” and I would like to strongly advice you to “resist” any self doubt and keep working bravely, as you did till now, towards your goals: you are an exceptionally gifted writer, fantastically precise in your choice and selection of words and extremely precise, crystal clear and razor sharp in your reasoning. Don’t let anything stop you!
    This episode (the underlined “not”) should not discourage you in any way… absolutely not!
    Your post reminded me of a very similar episode – different as for the circumstances but identical in its form – that happened to me when I was 14. My age (60) and my background are very different from yours – I’m Italian, grew up in Rome, in a time when schools in Italy were relatively homogeneous, especially in middle class environments (although Italy has never been a really homogeneus environment, all in all, and differences of all sorts have always been an/the Italian quintessence).
    At school I was a brilliant student, always had top marks. And from the very beginning of my first year at the “lycée” I learned to deeply like my professor of Italian, Latin, Greek an History: she was a remarkable woman and an exceptional teacher. And yet she inflicted me the worst wound I suffered in all my school career. Once, from a list of books proposed for “reading and reviewing” I choosed a book by the Italian writer Massimo
    Bontempelli. A fascinating story about a very beautiful woman who, realising she was aging and her beauty was leaving her, shut herself at home never to go out any more and cover all the mirrors on the walls so that nobody could see her anymore and that she cannot see herself either.
    I was totally intrigued by the story and eagerly wrote a review. I expected good marks for it. On the contrary, when giving it back to me, in front of the class, my teacher told me: “This is NOT “flour of your sack’…! ” (it is an Italian way of saying to mean “not something that could come from you”. At first I thought she was joking… and answered back smiling: “of course it is!” But she insisted: “This is not something you could have written. Too sophisticated !” I was first flattered by the implicit notion that what I had written was something really sophisticated… but at the same time I began realising that she was NOT joking, she was damn serious.., and therefore that meant NOT that she thought I could write something very sophisticated but rather she was thinking that I had CHEATED! I was overwhelmed by disbelief… SHE THOUGHT ME CAPABLE OF CHEATING!!!
    How could that be? Having to realise this was a total, devastating shock for me. Funny how real and detailed it is that awful feeling, still perfectly alive, deeply inside my conscience 46 years later!!!
    I remember I suddenly didn’t know what to say. I felt speechless
    I even remember that, for the lenght of a split second, a part of my brain was asking to the other part “did you REALLY wrote that?” and then my own reason prevailed – luckily ! / and I shouted back at myself “of course, who else?” And felt furious, and impotent.
    I went home submerged by a flow of mixed feelings and at home I talked to my mother (I very rarely talked to her of school matters. There was never much to say…) She – a teacher herself – had vaguely known the title of the book I reviewed but did not ever read it herself. She could not have written the review even if she had intended to! She said… So she decided to go and talk to my teacher. I don’t know what happened. My mum could e very convincing if she wanted. And she certainly wanted. But my teacher was adamant, and never admitted to have been wrong. And the idea that she did not believe me and, on the contrary, thought I could cheat, was unbearable for me, for many months.
    Teacher can be VERY, VERY WRONG, even the best of them, and students should NOT be influenced by them: they are human and every human being could be tragically wrong. I understand your circumstances are different from mine and you are suffering from a situation in which what you think is producing damages is a stupid lot of prejudices. But in the case of a written text it is POSSIBLE that a student – especially an exceptionally gifted student, as you are – is able to find a voice that doesn’t sound exactly as their voice.
    I honestly think – 46 years later, – that I also, deeply intrigued by that fantastic story, found within myself a voice that was not yet my voice but a voice I would have been able to fully develop only many years later. I’ve been a journalist and a dance critic all my life.
    My teacher could not recognised that, then, and was terribly wrong in thinking I had cheated. That was profoundly unjust. As was your teacher. But this things do happen, in every context and cirvumstamces. Dont let this stop you, please. You deserve the best. And you wil certainly accomplish your goals in life.
    I like the way you write: BRAVA!!!

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      1. “Well I’m not the special snowflake who beliefs in institutional racism and classism.” => I don’t believe in evolution or climate change either. I know them to be models of reality that best fit the data.

        The same with institutional racism and classism. Overwhelming evidence. As if a century of SLAVERY and Jim Crow and scientific studies showing implicit bias aren’t enough. But, like this woman’s experience, every day shows examples if you have eyes to see.

        But when you’re a racist snowflake, the bigot virus screws with your brain. Thoughts do not work well. You cannot see facts and reason correctly because you begin form a biased standpoint. You possess an unconscious set of axioms that shape your “logic”.

        It’s a disease. Luckily, like the measles, it is slowly being eradicated.

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      1. What ever happened to people having an nopen discussion? So the guys doesn’t agree with her. I don’t either. But I do believe in climate change and I do believe that institutional racism is an issue. However, the professor just called her out for using the word “Hence”. If you are 20 years old and you use the word “hence”, of course a professor is going to suspect plaigerism.

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      1. The idea that everyone in America is just on equal footing—especially considering OUR past—is naive and silly and doesn’t actually correlate with statistics.

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      2. Many people don’t have equal footing in society and I never claimed “the idea that everyone in America is just on equal footing” because you will see blacks, latinos, asians and you will not believe this but there are also whites who are poor. But that’s why we have public schools, grants and grants that are specialized for minorities where minorities can gain opportunities to achieve. And to blame “institutionalized oppression” is just an excuse. Would you like to know why there’s a disproportionate poverty rate in the black community? Because there is a disproportionate single motherhood rate and dropout rate in the black community. Hey as much as we talk about white privilege the fact is that the single motherhood rate in the black community in 1960’s was 20% percent today it is upwards of 70% percent unless you are going to argue that racism in the United States has more than tripled in the same period of time that the civil rights movement had its greatest successes is nonsense and again there’s not a white person anywhere that is forcing a black person to sleep with a black person conceive a child and not getting married it’s not happening. https://youtu.be/OnZb4FgJqUQ

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      3. You wanted violent blacks, you’re getting a violent black. Did you not know you were talking to a black person? I’m actually pretty non-violent as a person, but as a person who’s inherently inclined to adopted certain philosophies into her daily life as praxis, I decided to test out your little theory that us “Afro-Americans” are violent. So, I’m theoretically threatening to kick your ass, but now that you’re presented with the very threat you just posited as truth despite speaking to a non-violent black person, you’re nervous? Or worried? Or confused? I thought you said we were violent, but now that I threaten violence you act surprised. So now I’M confused, because it’s starting to sound like you don’t believe in the things you claim about us, that you’re just regurgitating flawed racist rhetoric from Breitbart and Reddit to satiate your own insecurities as a below-average white man, that blaming minorities for your problems has become easier than facing the reality of your own life in which you contribute nothing to anyone or anywhere and, thus, push racist narratives that you, deep down, know not to be true as a mask for it.

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      4. I wanted to show you a statistic from the FBI on crime by race and now you are threatening me with violence. Are you ok? Are you not able to have civil debate like normal and healthy human bean? I how old are you? Isn’t that the the problem with the “Afro-American” community? For God’s sake blacks are only 13% of the population and are responsible for 50% of the murder in the US. No wonder people can’t take the BLM movement seriously. It’s a parody that only inflamed violence.

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      5. You said us Negroes were violent, so I’m being violent. Does this fly in the face of your hypothesis now? Make up your mind.

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      6. I didn’t say “Negroes” or that Afro-American are violent I asked you if want me to show you statistics on how much the Afro-American minority is violent and specifically the Afro-American minority because black people here in Europe act normal and I’m talking straight outta Africa blacks. When I see the difference between Afro-americans and black people here in Europe you can see there is a cultural problem in the Afro-american community the gangs, the black on black violence, high high school dropout rate, seventy-two percent of black babies are born to unmarried mothers today and don’t blame the white men because nobody is forcing them to do this.

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      7. “I didn’t say…that Afro-American are violent I asked you if want me to show you statistics on how much the Afro-American minority is violent—”

        Are you dumb

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      8. New York Times, Washington Post, 13th, sociological journals, media psychology. Research these words: “prison industrial complex”, “institutionalized racism”, “school segregation”, “voter suppression”, “racist psychology”, and so on. Get an education, for Christ’s sake. You’re an adult with Internet access. NONE of this should be difficult. There is NO reason for you to hold such goofy views. C’mon now. I’m actually disappointed.

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      9. Why do dumb people try to evade any criticism or hole poked in their theories by saying they weren’t being “politically correct”? You literally just contradicted yourself in the same sentence, and THAT was the point of the fucking comment, you blithering idiot. My GOD, you people are on a whole other planet, I swear.

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      10. Like, seriously, dude, you’re very, very misinformed and stuck in 2004. I haven’t held views like this since middle school. There is so much information out there explaining and/or disproving everything you’re saying and you still choose to be ignorant to support your own racism? You’re hopeless.

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      11. Im pointing out that the problem is not in institutionalized oppression, in fact institutions are nominally set up to prevent racism. America has hate crime laws and equal protection laws and the media is more obsessed with finding cases of racism to lynch someone over than they are with the sex lives of celebrities. I know it happened in the past and it was not only towards blacks but also towards Irish, Italians and Jews. But in today’s society…really!? The problem comes from the Afro-American community, mentality and culture. What do you expect when so many blacks are dropping out from high school and half of murders in America is done by blacks!? Just one question are one of those special snowflakes who believe that black people can’t be racists?

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      12. Every time you open a paragraph I tune out. “Institutions are nominally set up to prevent racism”? Watch Ava Duvernay’s 13th.

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      13. I tune out because everything you say is idiotic lol. Damn, you really got offended by that, huh? Can’t handle when somebody doesn’t consider your opinion valid? I don’t have to, y’know.

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      1. I agree that Doniel is ignorant. But what is with all the ‘privilidged white guy'” stuff all the time from White girls when white American women are the most spoiled people on the planet.

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  13. Tiffany,
    As a former college professor, Dean, and provost, I felt a tear forming in my eyes. Racial and ethnic bias is alive and well in our academic institutions. Rarely did people want to acknowledge that fact whenever I raised it with faculty whose prejudicial words and behaviors were blatantly obvious. White privilege is so very present in academia! Standing up to it is the only way that the academic community can be held accountable. It is a cancer (one of many) in our American educational system. Keep up the good fight!

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  14. Your piece Academia, Love Me Back, was the only piece I have read thus far from seeing it shared on social media. I am intensely sympathetic to your position and am sorry you, and many like you, are subjected to this outdated thinking. I can only hope that in your future endeavors people see you for the intellectual you are.

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  15. You are an inspiration to us all. Continue the fight, not as a minority, but as an incredible human being, bold enough to share what her experiences are and speaking for those who have no voice. Luchadora, Adelante!

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    1. I responded to Tiffany also. I’m Latino mix. But I have seen the struggles of young single women from the Dominican Republic, Mexico and others under my association or employ who rose up and live comfortably as a business people or social advocates in Florida, California, Hawaii. I live comfortably in Hawaii. I have worked everywhere from Bank of America underwriting first time home buyers in California to Habitat for Humanity building homes for Hawaiians. I think showcasing Tiffany as a victim in social media is as bad as anything the professor could have done to her personally. Nobody seems to want to hear the professor’s side of the story. I have had several like the one she described. I had a learning disability as well. It was a professor like hers that had the most hope and belief in me and pushed the hardest. I took several courses twice with the same professors and was pushed harder the second time. One made me assemble and reassemble my work until it was perfect. I am 52 now. I retired at 40. If Tifffany’s professor didn’t care and was racist do you think they would ever write criticism about her work product again and push her to achieve? How will she feel when she is branded a victim now to be socially graduated going forward but scholastically mediocre and short-changed by fearful professors ? ?
      Michael Ferreira

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      1. Michael, you make a great point. I am a leftist leaning person myself, but his whole victim stuff is terrible for society. Ok, so the professor called her out for writing “Hence”. Any good professor should call out a 20 year old for using the word “Hence” because it sounds plaigerized.

        We are almost getting to the point of fascism in this country and it is scary. What is next? Will I lose my job now because I am voicing my opinion. And no, I am not a well to do white male from the suburbs. I grew up in a mixed environment from a working class background.

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  16. Hi Tiffany, as people are discovering your most recent piece, some higher-profile sites probably will be wanting to reprint it for you, if they haven’t asked already. I guess if you want to do that, it’s okay, but I just wanted to let you know that it’s okay to make sure that you’re getting paid for your writing. If the folks that want to print your work have advertising revenue, then if you’re writing for that site, then you deserve a check from this.

    Thanks for sharing – I know your story is far, far too common. It happens all the time. You expressed it really well and it’s getting the attention it deserves. Let’s hope it might actually change some minds.

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  17. Hi Tiffany – I’m a producer for Uproxx. Your words are so powerful, and I think your story is one that will really resonate with our audience. I would love to learn more about you and possibly do a video on it for our site. If you’re interested, please shoot me an email!

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  18. The level of your accomplishment is a profound testament to your intellect, determination, and ability to not only survive, but to thrive. Your professor is absolutely in the wrong, and I applaud you for bringing light to the significance of this issue. Privilege is all too often overlooked, and its power can be crippling. I identify with so many of your statements, and wish that I could offer a quick resolution to the issue. However, I think think that there is something to be said for fighting the academic institution from within. Best of luck to you, and I hope that you are able to continue to advocate for yourself. Your story has power, and your experiences matter a great deal, not only to yourself, but to those who see it.

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  19. We feel your pain Tiffany, hang in there. We need your intellect, work and beautiful spirit to help us continue to move forward.

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  20. Is there any way that you could share your professors side of this story, for the sake of fairness? On the surface this seems like a terrible professor judging a book by its cover, but this is a serious accusation and I’d love to know his response, even if just to confirm him as a bad professor. Did you speak to him after this incident? Has he said anything to you in the past about your writing style or suspicions of plagiarism?

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    1. What the ever loving hell is this? No. It’s not her job to give his side of the story, it’s her job to give HER side of the story. If you want fairness, contact the college and demand answers. That is THEIR job. She’s got nothing to prove to you, and your cross-examination basically boils down to “why should I believe you?” which is a very common method that oppressors use to derail and discredit the complaints of minorities about how they are treated.

      The only thing this young scholar needs to do is present her side of the “case”. You, on the other hand, need to GTFO.

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      1. Right? the accusation is all that matters. Don’t bother with any proof, like a turnitin score, don’t even provide us with an excerpt so that we can see how original or copied it is. Just expect people to blindly accept, don’t bother proving it. That’s why the message gets lost and noone listens, there’s no proof, there’s never any proof, but we’re always really sure the answer must be skin color.

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      2. To “Logic D Oesnotexist”: Good handle, because (1) she presented PROOF in PHOTOS of the essay showing the offensive comments, so, yes, GTFO and (2) there usually is proof but society will only jail PoC for dime bags, not treasonous white men who occupy public lands or white rapists (Brock Turner Syndrome), so why don’t you GTFO for that, too.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Yes. Here, on her blog, in her space, the accusation is all that matters. What matters here is her experience, and how she feels about it. Not something you want to give a damn about, clearly, but it does matter.

        The job of sorting out truth and lies is for the authorities, in this case, the college, to sort out. Not you. Not me.

        In the meantime, those of us who acknowledge that systemic racism is something many students of color experience in academia will choose to support this student’s right to speak up about her experiences. If that bothers you, feel free to stop reading and commenting on the STUDENT’S OWN BLOG.

        In short: GTFO.

        Liked by 1 person

  21. I would like to use this as a case study in a workshop for faculty on academic integrity. It’s easy to gather stories of student mistakes or infractions, not so easy to find stories of faculty mistakes.

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  22. Dear Tiffany,

    There are times in the English language when the word “fuck” is appropriate. Your telling your professor “fuck you” would be such an instance.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. I would like to agree with the other professors here who are posting support and outrage for you. You are a very talented writer and thinker. You remind me that we, as professors, would experience the benefit that we might offer students if we simply acknowledged students as collaborators in research and education. To pursue an elitist and marginalizing approach is to betray the philosophy that underlies education as an epistemology, a philosophy, and a process that is meant to improve the world.

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  24. Me encanta tu trabajo, Tiffany. Estaré pendiente de tus publicaciones. Como estudiante doctoral latina y migrante en Canadá puedo comprender lo que describes. Academia needs people like us, don’t give up.

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  25. Tiffany – Excellent post on what you correctly assessed as institutional racism in academia. Previous posts give excellent advice and I agree that this piece online piece along with your original paper should be submitted to your professor, your dean of students and the diversity program at your college/university. I hate that this happened to you but do not let them discourage you. You definitely have recourse and should act on it and continue to succeed. Wishing you success during the rest of this term. I hope for an update. – Susan

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  26. Tiffany, I see a number of people have made suggestions to be helpful concerning what happened with your paper.

    I think your professor needs to read what you wrote about it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree. The professor should read this article then reflect on her explicit bias. We are well into the 21st century; academia and professors need to evolve.

      Liked by 3 people

  27. The comments above cover much of what I am feeling. I would still like to add my voice and let you know you are heard and supported. For what it’s worth, despite presenting as white, I am part Latina and very proud of my heritage. Although my work is in the humanities, my family is full of Latina academics in the maths and sciences – brilliant, hardworking feminists who would love to see you as part of the academic community. You are talented, valuable, and needed. Please do take the advice of the other commenters and report this blatant act of discrimination. I cannot imagine it will be pleasant, but know that you have a global community supporting you.

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  28. I hope to God you pursue this and if at all possible, please keep us updated. I’m so very sorry this happened. I have no words. Know that I and countless others stand with you. I know what it’s like to have someone cause self doubt and break your confidence in a matter of SECONDS. This professor was wrong on all accounts and hope he’s dealt with accordingly. Wishing you the best.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Hi Tiffany,

    I would suggest filing a complaint immediately with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights. In addition to assisting you in the quest for justice, this action can also help you if you are subjected to retaliation for pursuing an appropriate remedy to this situation.

    *Disclaimer: This post does not constitute legal advice and does not establish an attorney-client relationship.*

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Hi Tiffany, I’m a State Representative in Maine (termed out at the end of the year), and now working across the bridge from you in Cambridge. Would love to take you to coffee and talk more about this, and specifically about your vision in life. As women, we cannot afford to bring the ladder up behind us. We must, instead, send more ladders down. For other reasons, I’ve been repeatedly told I’m not good enough and shouldn’t strive to break down barriers. And then, one day this summer, I found myself walking onstage at the DNC telling America why it was important to end the Superdelegate system once and for all. Seriously, let’s grab coffee. You can message me here: https://www.facebook.com/DianeMarieRussell/

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  31. Tiffany, I’m a playwright who is working on a script about academic discrimination. I’ve been working with academics who have faced similar situations of academic discrimination. Your story is revolting and motivating. Stay strong. There are people behind you. A congratulations for being upfront about your difficulty. (If you would like to share more of your encounter to help with my piece of drama, I would take eagerness in listening)

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  32. Dear Tiffany, I am a professor at the University of Notre Dame sitting at my desk angrier than angry for you and so humbled by your tenacity and beautiful writing. I am so very sorry that this is the treatment that you and so many others endure at the hands of academics and others in “professional worlds”. It is unwarranted, unjust and, as we know, all too common. Please let me and others know how we might support you and walk alongside you in your academic journey. I keep coming back to the question, ‘what do you need right now?’ Because, I for one, having read nothing more than this post but also knowing countless other students for whom this is a real, day to day experience, know that we need to do better. With admiration, Professor Maria McKenna

    Liked by 5 people

  33. You ain’t wrong. I was in English class at Riverside City College and, being that brown and intellectual don’t make sense, was called in to a professor’s office and offered the chance to admit to plagiarizing. I was incensed, obviously. I asked for a pen right there and told him I’d write a new piece. He relented, perhaps already having googled my piece and knowing it wasn’t stolen. Micro and macro-aggressions all fucking day when you’re not in that group given the pass. Thanks for sharing is such a lovely way. So many of us have been there. #LoveMeBack

    Liked by 3 people

  34. I’ve just read your post titled “Academia Love Me Back” and I’m incensed at the treatment you received from your professor. It’s certainly not my place to tell you what to do or how to react to this blatant disregard of your capabilities but I hope that you’ll report them both to their department and to the Suffolk University administration. My daughter is a teacher at the college level (not sure exactly what her title is) and I’ve discussed this with her. She’s as incensed as I am that someone in her professions has treated you in this manner as it reflects poorly on all instructors. I’ll understand if you choose not to report your experience because academia has somewhat of a “circle the wagons” mentality when one of their own is accused. It won’t be easy and it will take a lot of effort on your part but I hope you shine the light of day on this academic cockroach so that you and others don’t have to face this in the future.

    Good luck whatever you decide to do.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Please report your experience so that others behind you do not have to experience the same from these instructors. Thank you so much for this reflection piece. It continues to show educators that the power they carry must be used with dignity and caring for others.

      My name is Professor Margaret Barrow and I am working with Professor Tracy Bealer and our Student Government Association at Borough of Manhattan Community College. We would love for you to contact us to discuss presenting at our first Student Conference next fall 2017. Please contact me at: mbarrow@bmcc.cuny.eud. We think you would enrich our program deeply.

      My hope is that those faculty and friends I have sent your post to on Facebook will reach out to you. It is my hope that we build a network of support around you so that you feel supported and cared for while you pursue your advanced degrees. I am willing to be one of your mentors if you need and want one. Look me up on LinkedIn and Ratebyprofessor.com if you like. I have a strong philosophy in caring for my students success and advocating for them.
      You are loved by many–

      Liked by 2 people

  35. Thank you for sharing your story. As a person who has worked in Human Resources for 14 years, I suggest you take your paper to the Dean of Faculty and pursue this issue further. I am currently attending a seminary in the U.S. and one of my fellow students (an African American female) shared with me her story of similar treatment she received from one of our New Testament professors. The professor (a white female) could not believe that at grad student could present a paper that was so well thought out and written. She accused the student of plagiarism and made her schedule an appointment with the professor to review her research materials line by line together with the paper. In the end, all turned out OK, but my friend was greatly humiliated to have to go to such lengths to prove her work.

    You are a tremendous writer and I congratulate you on your accomplishments! God has given you a tremendous gift. Please continue to share it with the world.

    Liked by 1 person

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